dorihbutler (dorihbutler) wrote,
dorihbutler
dorihbutler

Celebrating Banned Books Week

Is there any better time to find out one of your books has been challenged than Banned Books Week? I don't think so.

When I said that to my husband this morning, he wanted to know which book. As though I've published more than one book that people find objectionable enough to challenge.

I said, "which one do you think?"

He guessed this one:




Wrong.

Very few people have actually read Alexandra Hopewell, Labor Coach. Or even heard about it. I know...people who challenge books don't have to read the book to know it shouldn't be in the library. (I sat on a challenge committee years ago and actually heard a challenger say that: "I don't have to read the book to know it doesn't belong in the library.") But they do have to know it exists.

And even if people did know about Alexandra Hopewell, Labor Coach, there isn't anywhere near as much to complain about in that book as there is in this one:




To my knowledge this book has been challenged in Kansas, Indiana, and now Georgia. One of the schools moved it to an area where kids couldn't check the book out without a note from a parent. I don't believe it's actually been removed from a collection anywhere.

This is a very naughty book. It contains words like bladder, penis, fallopian tube, and vagina. Even worse, there are pictures! Children not only discover that they actually have some of these parts, they also learn where those parts are:




It gets worse. Elizabeth asks this fateful question:




(By the way, the words are mine...the pictures are not. The artist is the very talented Carol Thompson, from Leicestershire, England.)

And Elizabeth's mother tells her the truth:




The above is the page people object to most often.

I am the first to admit that this book is not for everyone. I didn't write it for everyone; I wrote it for families with precocious children who ask questions like "where do babies come from?" and "how does the baby get in there?" Some kids ask those questions at age four. Others ask them at age eight. Others never ask...and sadly, some of those kids have parents who follow a don't-ask-don't-tell policy when it comes to sex ed. That is their right. Personally, I believe in talking openly and honestly with kids. I would rather my children receive accurate information from me than inaccurate information from their peers. But that's just me.

If your child isn't ready for this information, or you're not ready to discuss it (I also wrote this book for parents to read WITH their children rather than for kids to read on their own), then by all means, DON'T READ IT! It is your right as a parent (maybe even your obligation) to choose what is and isn't appropriate for your child. But you do not get to make that decision for everybody else's child. If everybody in the world could remove books from the library that were objectionable to them for any reason, there wouldn't be much left in the library.
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  • Games

    I love games! I play a mean game of Scrabble (better not play with me unless you regularly put down words like “ai,” (a three-toed sloth), “jo” (a…

  • Radio Interviews

    The first time I was invited to do a radio interview, I said, "no, thank you." And I didn't do it. The second time I was invited to do a radio…

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